Articles Posted in Divorce

Divorce Considerations During the Coronavirus Crisis | Divorce Attorney Andrea Vacca | Vacca Family Law Group

In any divorce, there are 3 key stages: the first divorce consideration is the decision about whether to divorce, the second is moving forward through the divorce process you’ve chosen, and the third is finalizing the details of the divorce. This is true whether you’re divorcing at a time when the outside world is relatively stable or whether you’re moving through the process when there’s a global pandemic.

Regardless of where you may be in your divorce process, here are some tips for how to adjust to a constantly shifting environment and the timelines, expectations and assumptions you may have been counting on before the world was put on pause.

1. Deciding Whether to Divorce: Should I Stay or Should I Go?

New York collaborative divorce and mediation lawyer Andrea Vacca spoke to Marysol Castro of Pix11 Morning News and was asked whether there really is a divorce season (the answer is YES!) and to offer some divorce tips for how to navigate the early stages of divorce. Thanks to Elizabeth Martin for sharing her divorce story. 

WATCH: NYC Divorce Attorney Andrea Vacca: How to Navigate the Early Stages of Divorce

https://youtu.be/_pDMrcvdmEs

If you are afraid to tell your spouse you want a divorce because you are not sure that the risks are going to outweigh the rewards then this video is for you.

WATCH: 3 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Wait to Say You Want a Divorce by Family Law Attorney Andrea Vacca

https://youtu.be/zHmSb4Y4wNU

When someone is first thinking about filing for divorce, they don’t often think about the lack of privacy that comes with the traditional divorce process. In New York, courtrooms are open to everyone.  Reporters may be in the courtroom, neighbors may be in the courtroom, parents from your kid’s school may be in the courtroom… you get it. An open courtroom means anyone can walk in, sit down and listen to all the gory details of your life. 

And if you’re a prominent person in any way, your story may end up on Page Six. Take, for example, the divorce of ex-New York Times publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr. and financier Gabrielle Greene. Their attorneys may claim this is a “private” matter, yet they’ve chosen to litigate the matter in New York State Supreme Court and are scheduled to appear in court in 2 weeks. This divorce will be anything but private. 

Another recent prominent divorce involves the Dixie Chicks’ Natalie Maines. Look at the information made public in this case. In addition to disclosing the fact that her monthly expenses total approximately $50,000 per month and include $23,000 per month for her mortgage alone, we now know the values of her: 

For most people, the holiday season is the happiest of times, but for families in the middle of a divorce or after the conclusion of a divorce, this season can be the toughest. Parents often say their top goal in the divorce is that the children’s lives don’t change. But realistically, whether because of divorce or other circumstances, children’s lives do change. If parents can take care of themselves so that their own pain from the divorce is not the overriding shadow darkening the holidays, they can use this time as one of the greatest teaching moments as parents. For this reason, we have put together a 3-part holiday planning series to help divorcing or divorced parents navigate the holidays with as much ease and joy as possible. 

Here, in Part 1, we focus on families who are in the middle of the divorce process or have only just recently decided to end their marriage. This can be a tricky time because when you’re in the early or middle stages of divorce, a final agreement has not been reached and finalized. 

Like so much of a family’s life during this time, everything, including the holidays, feels like it is in suspense. In a pending divorce, when parents are preparing for and attending meetings with their attorneys and other divorce professionals, the process can leave them feeling overwhelmed with their day-to-day lives. Suddenly, one of the holidays is just around the corner and it hits them: what are we doing this year? Here are some holiday planning considerations for parents in the middle of a divorce.

Recently, I was interviewed on the TUFF LOVE podcast with Robert Kandell about The Radical Change of Gender Dynamics in Modern Divorce to discuss my practice as a Collaborative Divorce Lawyer & Mediator. Listen to the podcast, and learn why I am passionate about non-adversarial divorce:

  • What led me to practice divorce law
  • How to have a non-adversarial divorce

Vacca Family Law Group Named to 2019 Law Firm 500 | Andrea Vacca | Vacca Family Law Group

Vacca Family Law Group is honored to announce that our law firm has been named a 2019 Law Firm 500 Honoree, awarded to the Fastest Growing Law Firms in the US. We ranked 67 with a growth rate of 72%. We appreciate the support of our clients and colleagues who helped us get where we are today.

Our law firm is committed to helping our clients put their families first and dissolve their marriages without litigation. In addition to working with clients who have decided to end their marriage but are looking for a better way, we work with couples to create prenuptial agreements that plan for a healthy marriage. With discretion, elevated service and a flexible approach, we specialize in finding creative (and sometimes unconventional) solutions that are right for each client’s unique situation.

Andrea Vacca, founder of the Vacca Family Law Group, said,

Divorce in New York can be expensive and this is especially true if there are complicated issues involved regarding finances or your children. But there are things you can do to keep the costs down.

I recently contributed to a Forbes Next Avenue article 8 Ways to Lower the Cost of a Divorce. The article makes it clear that with planning and some DIY homework, you can lower the attorney fees for your divorce.

In addition to the 8 tips in the article, I would add these as well:

In most divorces, both spouses are aware that the marriage is ending and they decide what process they will use to reach an agreement, such as using mediation or the collaborative process. In other divorces, however, there has not been a meeting of the minds. While one spouse has been contemplating ending the marriage for months or even years, the other spouse seems to have no idea how bad things have gotten and your spouse doesn’t want to end the marriage.

I hear about these situations quite often. Let’s say it’s the wife who wants the divorce and she feels she has tried repeatedly to get her husband to work with her to resolve the problems in the marriage. For whatever reason, nothing has changed and the wife is now ready to do whatever she needs to do to get out of her unhappy marriage.

Perhaps she was referred to an attorney who represented a friend in her divorce. And the attorney tells her that she can start a court action, have the husband served with a Summons with Notice in an Action for Divorce and he will then have no choice but to deal with the situation.

We loiter in winter when it is already spring. 

– Henry David Thoreau

Navigating a divorce is not easy and I’m not going to try and convince you otherwise. But I will tell you that where you choose to place your focus can have a real impact on your well-being during this difficult time.